Jan Butchofsky/Alamy



Sandia Peak Ski and Tramway
Mile Marker 6 State Highway 536
Sandia Park
(505) 242-9052
www.sandiapeak.com

Albuquerque Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.itsatrip.org

Albuquerque BioPark
903 10th St. SW
Albuquerque
(505) 768-2000
www.cabq.gov/culturalservices/biopark

American International Rattlesnake Museum
202 San Felipe NW, Suite A
Albuquerque
(505) 242-6569
www.rattlesnakes.com

¡Explora! children’s museum
1701 Mountain Road NW
Albuquerque
(505) 224-8300
www.explora.us

High Finance Restaurant & Tavern
40 Tramway Road
Albuquerque
(505) 243-9742
www.sandiapeakrestaurants.com/highfinance

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science
1801 Mountain Road NW
Albuquerque
(505) 841-2800
www.nmnaturalhistory.org

Sandia Peak Ski and Tramway

Facts & Stats
Base elevation: 8,677 feet | Top elevation: 10,377 feet | Vertical drop: 1,700 feet | Skiable acres: 200 | Number of runs: 30 trails; 35% beginner, 55% intermediate, 10% expert | Number of lifts: 4 | Terrain Parks: 1 — Scrapyard | Adult full-day ticket: $50 | Lodging: Available in Albuquerque


Skiing in Albuquerque? You bet. At the top of Sandia Mountain, just east of New Mexico’s most populous city, is Sandia Peak Ski and Tramway, a small but scenic and convenient area where you can ski a half day and still have time to play a round of golf or mountain bike in Albuquerque. Getting to Sandia is half the fun. You can drive up the scenic eastern backside of the mountain along State Highway 536, about 30 minutes from Albuquerque, or take one of the world’s longest aerial tramways, which soars for a span of 2.7 miles, up the mountain’s western face above the Sandia wilderness. Grab a drink, a snack or dinner at High Finance Restaurant & Tavern at the top of the slopes and take in the gorgeous view of Albuquerque laid out more than 5,000 feet below. Off the mountain, shop the local boutiques and art galleries in Old Town or explore the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, ¡Explora! children’s museum, the Albuquerque BioPark or the American International Rattlesnake Museum.

For kids: Sandia is a great family mountain that’s easily made part of a larger Albuquerque vacation. Newbies can build confidence on beginner slopes or try the Scrapyard terrain park.




















Jen Judge/Corbis


Ski Santa Fe

Facts & Stats
Base elevation: 10,350 feet | Top elevation: 12,075 feet | Vertical drop: 1,725 feet | Skiable acres: 660 | Number of runs: 77 trails; 20% beginner, 40% intermediate, 40% expert | Number of lifts: 7 | Terrain Parks: 1 — The Bone Yard | Adult full-day ticket: $66 | Lodging: In Santa Fe
Ski Santa Fe

Ski Santa Fe
1477 State Highway 475
Santa Fe
(505) 982-4429
www.skisantafe.com

Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau
www.santafe.org

Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa
1297 Bishop’s Lodge Road
Santa Fe
(505) 629-4822
www.bishopslodge.com

Ten Thousand Waves
3451 Hyde Park Road
Santa Fe
(505) 982-9304
www.tenthousandwaves.com

Totemoff Bar and Grill
(located midmountain)
Santa Fe
(505) 992-5098


Perched high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains 16 miles from Santa Fe, Ski Santa Fe has been busy this year expanding its La Casa Day Lodge development to 12,000 feet of gear shops and restaurants.

Mogul and glade lovers thrill at the terrain and views from the top of the Millennium Triple Chair lift. After a long day of skiing, relax at Ten Thousand Waves Japanese spa or enjoy dinner at Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort and Spa, both on the way to the ski area at the top of State Highway 475. Totemoff Bar and Grill on the slopes is a must-stop for a fireside burger, beer or Totemoff’s Special (hot chocolate, Copa de Oro and Wild Turkey). Or venture into Santa Fe, a 40-minute drive from the mountain.

For kids: Chipmunk Corner children’s center has a day care, a snow play area, and ski and snowboard lessons for kids 3 and older.