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Lawrence Halprin's Lovejoy Fountain Plaza, 1966
Perhaps Portland's finest outdoor plaza, this celebration of waterfalls and geographical features of the Pacific Northwest consists of stair steps, whooshing water, and organic shapes. Its creator also designed the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C. SW Third Avenue and Harrison Street

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A.E. Doyle's Multnomah County Library Central, 1913
A bibliophile's fantasy, this icon of American architecture is an adventure in grandeur. Huge windows, a towering ceiling, and an elegant staircase inside convey permanence, and the outside exemplifies the architect's fascination with European styles. The Georgian-influenced exterior is a symphony of red brick and white stone. 801 SW 10th Avenue, www.multcolib.org

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Pietro Belluschi's Commonwealth Building, 1944-1948
Seemingly floating in the sky, this sleek glass tower, a vision of sea-green glass and gleaming metal, was the first of its kind, pioneering the way for other famous buildings like New York's Lever House and the United Nations Building. What set it apart? Among other things, it was the first to be sheathed in aluminum, be fully air-conditioned, and feature double-sealed glass windows (reducing solar heat and eliminating sky glare). It also set the standard for compact, boxlike structures. 421 SW Sixth Avenue, between Washington and Stark streets
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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Gordon House, 1964
The only Wright-designed building in Oregon, and the only one open to the public in the entire Pacific Northwest, this tiny house exemplifies Wright’s Usonian model. Less than an hour away from Portland, it manifests elements such as floor-to-ceiling windows, an open floor plan, and a cantilevered roof with a broad overhang. 879 West Main Street, Silverton, Oregon; www.thegordonhouse.org


Photos by Lincoln Barbour - www.lincolnbarbour.com