THE COMING COLLAPSE OF CHINA
By Gordon G. Chang, Random House, $26.95


Gordon G. Chang, a Chinese-American lawyer who has done business in China for two decades, doesn’t happily accept the conventional wisdom that the 21st century will belong to the People’s Republic of China. China, says Chang in 358 closely reasoned and heavily documented pages, is a paper tiger. Failing state-owned enterprises, insolvent banks, disappearing foreign investment, and ruinous deflation join with
corruption and resistance to change to ensure that China will not soon develop into the economic superpower many Western pundits predict.

Instead, China’s impending entry to the World Trade Organization means that, once exposed to the full competitive might of other economies, it will rapidly disintegrate into political and commercial chaos. If things even get that far, Chang adds, darkly describing a scenario for an all-too-plausible, if doomed, attempt by mainland China to invade Taiwan.

OUR SEPARATE WAYS: BLACK AND WHITE WOMEN AND THE STRUGGLE FOR PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY
By Ella L.J. Edmondson Bell and Stella M. Nkomo, Harvard Business School Press, $29.95


Two African-American business professors present their eight-year study of the struggles of successful black and white female corporate executives, and call for the bonds of gender to overcome the divisions of race. Offers insight into issues managers shouldn’t ignore.

PARTNERS.COM: HOW TO PROFIT FROM THE NEW DNA OF BUSINESS
By Michael J. Cunningham, Perseus Publishing, $27.50

The Internet’s real power for changing business may lie in the way it enables and encourages alliances, affiliations, co-marketing, and other forms of partnership between companies, argues this e-commerce consultant.