Need ideas for where to take your valentine to sweep her off her feet? You needn’t look any further than your — well, her — favorite romantic comedies. Here’s a cheat sheet to a few of the locations where movie magic could translate into real-life romance.


Everett Collection
Manhattan (1979)
Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History
New York
Woody Allen’s homage to his home city immediately summons the iconic image of Allen and Diane Keaton chatting on a bench as the sun rises over the Queensboro Bridge. But just as heartwarming is the scene in which they duck into the Hayden Planetarium to escape a sudden lightning storm. What’s more romantic than a little stargazing?



Everett Collection
Notting Hill (1999)
The Savoy Hotel
London
The famous Portabello Road, with its weekday fruit-and-vegetable market and weekend antique vendors, plays a key role in this Hugh Grant-Julia Roberts romantic comedy. But the film’s dramatic climax comes when Grant’s Will proposes to Roberts’ Anna during a press conference at the Savoy Hotel. The hotel is an international fixture, having recently undergone an extensive renovation. The Savoy Tea patisserie is the perfect spot to take in a traditional English cuppa and bask in the hotel’s opulence.



High Fidelity (2000)
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Everett Collection
Double Door
Chicago
Like all good rom-coms, this one ends on a hopeful note, when an endlessly embittered record-store clerk, played by Jack Black, gets a chance to shine, singing “Let’s Get It On” onstage. The scene was shot at Chicago’s famous Double Door, a former liquor store and rooming house turned live-music venue. It’s a great place to grab a beer, catch a show and maybe even serenade your date with a little Marvin Gaye.



Amélie (2001)
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Everett Collection
Lamarck-Caulaincourt Metro Station
Paris
As part of the quirky title character’s mission to bring joy to complete strangers, she breathlessly describes the sights and smells in the Lamarck-Caulaincourt Metro Station to a blind man. The man is overwhelmed by the random act of kindness, and while leaving the station, Amélie spots a handsome young love interest. Only in the City of Love could romance blossom in such an ordinary place as a train station.